Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

The most dangerous part of flying any small airplane is in the takeoff and landing phase of each flight. Taking off from a runway too short, for the size and power of the aircraft, colliding with obstacles during climb out, and overrunning the runway during landing certainly are known to happen on an infrequent basis. Because distance factors play such an important role at key moments of each flight, being an experienced pilot will ensure safe operation of the aircraft during these important times of the pilot’s flight.

On takeoff or approach, the pilot needs to be aware of all circumstances under his control, along with the circumstances not under his control. First, during takeoff, the pilot needs to be aware that for every 10% increase in carrying weight, they must allow for 20% more distance needed to take off, and 10% more distance in length when landing.

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Should there be a tailwind at the moment of liftoff, or landing, by just 10%, the pilot must compensate for the wind by having at least 20% more runway distance on both takeoff and landing. Should the pilot be landing on soft ground or snow, it’s imperative to know that they have at least 25% more runway than is typically required under normal conditions in both taking off and landing.

Should it be necessary for the pilot to take off in their small plane on a hill sloping upwards of 2% they’ll need 10% more distance to be safe. However, if landing on an upward slope of 2% they’ll require 10% less distance. Landing on wet grass, either long or short, the pilot must calculate that they have at least 30% more runway for takeoff and up to 40% more for landing.

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Cessna 406 Bush Plane

Dry grass, whether short or long, is about the same, requiring 25% more distance to takeoff, and 30% more to land. Understanding all the conditions of the runway will help the pilot determine the safe amount of area needed when handling their plane.

Should the pilot be carrying 10% more weight than is typically normal, landing in snow all on a downward slope, they must factor in all these conditions to reach the conclusion of exactly how much distance they need to safely land. Taking these factors into consideration, along with the cleanliness of the aircraft, the pressure in the tires, the condition of the plane’s engine and propeller performance are all critical factors when determining takeoff and landings.

By Andrew Berrey
Article Source: ezinearticles.com